Coolidge: A Lesson for Conservatives

On December 20, 2015, in America, Freedom, Government, History, Liberty, Politics, President, Taxes, Theodore Roosevelt, by Derrick G. Jeter

Alice Roosevelt Longworth, the eldest daughter of Theodore Roosevelt, once remarked that our thirtieth president, Calvin Coolidge, looked like he had been weaned on a pickle—and a sour one at that. Coolidge is one of those presidents we think we know, but we don’t. We know anecdotes about the man, like Alice’s comment on his […]

9/11 and the American Soul

Has it really been fourteen years? In my mind’s eye it was just yesterday when Chris Williams, Jan White, and I left our Boston hotel on our way to your Rhode Island client, CVS Pharmacy, and Chris received the call from Joe, her husband: America was under attack. In the days following September 11, 2001, […]

In Gardens of Stone

On May 25, 2015, in America, Courage, Death, Freedom, Heroes, History, Liberty, Memorial Day, Patriotism, Soldiers, War, by Derrick G. Jeter

In gardens of stone, lay soldiers who stood alone on frozen hills, beside vallied rills. In gardens of stone, a trumpet blown over markers of the brave, who rest within the grave. In gardens of stone, our flag is flown in vigil of red, white, and blue, for those who loved their country true. In […]

“Empire of the Summer Moon”: A Book Review

On April 24, 2015, in America, Books, Heroes, History, Texas, by Derrick G. Jeter

When civilizations clash conflict and death often ensue. Such was the case with the collision between white settlers and the aborigines of the central plains of North America. The American Indian wars was the stuff of legend—George Custer, the 7th Calvary, Sitting Bull, and the Little Big Horn; George Crook, Tom Horn, and the Apache […]

“The Liberty Threat”: Is America Losing Her Religious Freedom?

The power and beauty of “We the people” no longer means what it once did because we the people no longer give much thought to the document that made famous that phrase. In fact, we the people no longer remember that that phrase and document, among other things, were drafted to “secure the blessings of […]

“Founders’ Son”: The Fathers in Abraham Lincoln’s Life

When Abraham Lincoln departed his Springfield, Illinois home in 1861, to be inaugurated as the sixteenth President of the United States, he told his friends and neighbors that the task before him was “more difficult than that which devolved upon General Washington.” One could argue the historical accuracy of that claim, but all must agree […]

Gratitude: Happiness Doubled by Joy

On November 27, 2014, in America, Thanksgiving, Virtue, by Derrick G. Jeter

Erma Bombeck called Thanksgiving, “pig-out time throughout the land.” And O. Henry called the holiday, “purely American. The holiday may be purely American—and a time to pig-out on turkey—but the attitude is purely Christian. Few things are more unChristian than for a forgiven sinner to be an ungrateful saint. Ungratefulness is a sign of pride, […]

The Soldier on Crutches

On November 11, 2014, in America, Courage, Freedom, Heroes, Liberty, Patriotism, Soldiers, Veterans, War, by Derrick G. Jeter

On the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of eleventh month in 1918, “the war to end all wars,” as it was touted, ended. The Great War—World War I—was the first modern war and ushered in a century of warfare that left in its wake unimaginable death, destruction, and disabilities. World War I itself took […]

Os Guinness’s Ambitious Plan for a Global Public Square

On November 3, 2014, in America, Books, Faith, Freedom, Future, Government, Liberty, by Derrick G. Jeter

During the Constitutional Convention many feared that the proposed form of government granted too much power to the federal institution. Tepid supporters and critics, as well as Anti-Federalist opponents, believed the Constitution should have included a list of citizens’ rights. Ardent supporters, like James Madison, believed an articulation of rights was a Pandora’s Box, fearing […]

“Unbroken”: Unspeakable Suffering, Unrelenting Savagery

On September 18, 2014, in America, Books, Courage, Faith, Forgiveness, Freedom, Heroes, History, Soldiers, Suffering, War, by Derrick G. Jeter

Laura Hillenbrand has only written two books but she ranks as one of America’s most gifted narrative historians. Along with David McCullough and Nathaniel Philbrick, Hillenbrand’s histories are novel-like. But her histories aren’t make believe. Like McCullough and Philbrick, Hillenbrand’s storytelling talent is backed by meticulous historical research and rigor. In her first book, Seabiscuit: […]