Washington: A Life

On April 23, 2017, in America, American Revolution, Books, Founding Fathers, George Washington, Heroes, History, by Derrick G. Jeter

Of all the founding fathers, George Washington is the least understood. He comes out of history as the marble-man—about as approachable and warm as the marble sarcophagus that entombs his bones at Mount Vernon. He is everyone’s hero. But he is a hero of god-like stature—almost inconceivable that anyone like him could have actually existed […]

The Colossus of Independence

The morning of July 1, 1776, dawned hot and humid. Before the morning ended a summer storm engulfed Philadelphia. John Adams woke before the dawn. He dress, wrote a letter to Archibald Bulloch, ate breakfast, and walked to the State House. “This morning is assigned the greatest debate of all,” he told Bulloch. “A declaration, […]

Founding Fathers Friday: Abraham Baldwin

In the late eighteenth century, Georgia was America’s far-flung and backwoods colony. More of an appendix than a vital organ to the overall wellbeing of the original thirteen. Large in land, Georgia was puny in population—in 1787 it boasted of approximately 25,000 souls, while the city of Philadelphia boasted of 40,000 souls. But Georgia was […]

Founding Fathers Friday: William Few

On December 13, 2013, in America, American Revolution, Founding Fathers, Freedom, Heroes, History, Liberty, Patriotism, by Derrick G. Jeter

When we think about the Founders we often envision them as a pantheon of wealthy white men—men born to privilege and prestige. Of course all of them were white. Nearly all were wealthy—at least for their day. (It should noted, however, that a great many of them also carried heavy debts.) But not all of […]

Founding Fathers Friday: John Taylor of Caroline

On December 6, 2013, in America, American Revolution, Declaration of Independence, Founding Fathers, Freedom, by Derrick G. Jeter

We tend to think of the Founding Fathers as a homogeneous band of white men wearing powdered wigs and silk stockings. And while it’s true all the men we call Founding Fathers were white and wore powdered wigs and silk stockings, they were hardly indistinguishable when it came to the really important things in life—religion […]

Founding Fathers Friday: Francis Marion

On November 29, 2013, in America, American Revolution, Founding Fathers, Freedom, Heroes, History, Liberty, Patriotism, by Derrick G. Jeter

He didn’t sign the Declaration of Independence. He didn’t sign the United States Constitution. He didn’t serve in the Federal Congress. He didn’t even fight in the Continental Army. Yet, without his activities as a militia man on the southern front in the War for Independence, America would be a different country. History has all […]

Founding Fathers Friday: Pierce Butler

On November 22, 2013, in America, American Revolution, Founding Fathers, Freedom, Heroes, History, Liberty, Patriotism, U.S. Constitution, by Derrick G. Jeter

When British soldiers disembarked onto the shores of America in the mid- to late 1760s, or during the War of Independence, they could hardly believe their eyes. America was a paradise, a land “flowing with milk and honey.” Americans had land in abundance, clear air and water, food stores bulging to overflowing, educated citizens, and […]

Founding Fathers Friday: Charles Pinckney

On November 15, 2013, in America, American Revolution, Founding Fathers, Freedom, Heroes, History, Liberty, Patriotism, U.S. Constitution, by Derrick G. Jeter

Everybody knows James Madison is the “Father of the Constitution”—it’s architect and author. Right? Well, not exactly. Madison didn’t author the document—a committee of five put the draft together and Gouverneur Morris wrote the preamble. And there’s some evidence—or at least tradition—that Madison wasn’t the first architect of the Constitution. That designation may belong to […]

Founding Fathers Friday: Charles Cotesworth Pinckney

Few of the Founding Fathers, during their lifetimes, were overshadowed by their family members. The Adams cousins being the exception. Samuel Adams was more famous than his younger cousin John—for a time—until Sam dropped out of national politics and John became President of the United States. But Charles Cotesworth Pinckney was almost overshadowed by his […]

Founding Fathers Friday: John Rutledge

Many of the Founding Father had tragic lives, especially at the end of their lives. But John Rutledge’s life was the stuff of Greek tragedy. Born on September 17, 1739, to one of the wealthiest families in Charleston, South Carolina, Rutledge his early childhood surrounded by luxury and ease. His father, an Irish immigrant and […]