Books from 2015

On January 1, 2016, in Books, Faith, Freedom, Future, God, Government, Heroes, History, Literature, Same-Sex Marriage, Theology, by Derrick G. Jeter

The best decorations are walls filled with love and laughter from treasured ones. The next best are walls filled with books you treasure. Anyone who has been in my home office knows I have plenty of books I treasure—over two thousand volumes . . . and growing. I’ve either read, plan to read, or have […]

Finally, a Leadership Book on Creativity

On October 24, 2015, in Books, Leadership, by Derrick G. Jeter

As important as the subject is, most books on leadership promise much but deliver little. They always seem to be couched in a step program designed to convince you the difficult task of leading is easy . . . if you follow seven simple steps. (Or however many step it takes to become Churchillian.) Filled […]

The Making of an American Legend

On June 18, 2015, in Books, Culture, History, Literature, Movies, Texas, by Derrick G. Jeter

“That’ll be the day!” is one of the most iconic lines John Wayne ever uttered on screen. It comes from John Ford’s classic western, The Searchers—the 1955 film based on Alan LeMay’s novel of the same title. Shot in Monument Valley, one of the most unlikely representations of Texas one could find, the film is stunning […]

“Empire of the Summer Moon”: A Book Review

On April 24, 2015, in America, Books, Heroes, History, Texas, by Derrick G. Jeter

When civilizations clash conflict and death often ensue. Such was the case with the collision between white settlers and the aborigines of the central plains of North America. The American Indian wars was the stuff of legend—George Custer, the 7th Calvary, Sitting Bull, and the Little Big Horn; George Crook, Tom Horn, and the Apache […]

Who Is Jesus, Really? “The Unique One” has the Answer

On April 16, 2015, in Belief, Bible, Books, Christianity, Faith, God, Jesus Christ, by Derrick G. Jeter

Napoleon Bonaparte had an ego twice the size of his own stature. He thought the Duke of Wellington a poor general and the British poor soldiers—at least he thought so before the Battle of Waterloo. But when it came to Jesus Christ, not even Bonaparte’s massive ego could stand with knees locked. “Everything in Christ […]

“The Liberty Threat”: Is America Losing Her Religious Freedom?

The power and beauty of “We the people” no longer means what it once did because we the people no longer give much thought to the document that made famous that phrase. In fact, we the people no longer remember that that phrase and document, among other things, were drafted to “secure the blessings of […]

Books from 2014

On January 1, 2015, in Books, Culture, History, Literature, Philosophy, Politics, Theology, by Derrick G. Jeter

Books are one of the joys of life. And though it might be a bit of hyperbole, I heartily agree with Thomas Jefferson: “I cannot live without books.” I haven’t always been a reader, but I’m so grateful that I discovered them as a young adult. Now I’m trying to catch up for all the […]

“Founders’ Son”: The Fathers in Abraham Lincoln’s Life

When Abraham Lincoln departed his Springfield, Illinois home in 1861, to be inaugurated as the sixteenth President of the United States, he told his friends and neighbors that the task before him was “more difficult than that which devolved upon General Washington.” One could argue the historical accuracy of that claim, but all must agree […]

“Daily Rituals: How Artists Work”

On November 14, 2014, in Books, Culture, Writing, by Derrick G. Jeter

Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals: How Artists Work is an intriguing idea . . . poorly executed. But perhaps that’s not quite fair. I’m not sure anyone could have pulled off an engaging read of the daily routines of creatives. As interesting as it sounds, delving into the daily work habits of Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott […]

Os Guinness’s Ambitious Plan for a Global Public Square

On November 3, 2014, in America, Books, Faith, Freedom, Future, Government, Liberty, by Derrick G. Jeter

During the Constitutional Convention many feared that the proposed form of government granted too much power to the federal institution. Tepid supporters and critics, as well as Anti-Federalist opponents, believed the Constitution should have included a list of citizens’ rights. Ardent supporters, like James Madison, believed an articulation of rights was a Pandora’s Box, fearing […]